Scroll arrow
Scroll arrow
Scroll arrow
Scroll arrow
Scroll arrow
Scroll arrow

Leg Up

Board Storage System

Designed during New Zealand’s COVID-19 Alert Levels 4 to 2, the original brief for this university project was adapted to the circumstances. The resulting brief tasked us with utilising research completed prior to lockdown, identify an idea, and develop into an innovative design for a specific aspect of freedom camping or related field. Due to the circumstances, there was limited access to modelling materials and the final outcome was designed in CAD and digitally rendered.

Working as a group, we combined our research and found the opportunity to improve the accessibility and storage of board based sports products, while freedom camping. This was from the insight that adrenaline junkies were frustrated with rearranging their space throughout the day to accommodate their boards. This takes time away from their fun and negatively impacts their living conditions. To frame the research better, we developed a persona from interviews and a scenario highlighting their issues. This helped centre our design and was a common point of reference. We then began a series brainstorming, and picking out key terms and issues. After spending time on concepts, we refined our developments to 3 key concepts, each with aspects that were brought forward to our final, using a weighted matrix. Before making the final, we also developed a technical specification, researching different board sizes, and how existing roof racks functioned.

Designed on the specifications of the industry standard Toyota HiAce LV2000, the unit has potential for use on a wide range of vehicles. The rack has a length of 2 metres and width of 1.2 metres, and can effectively fit any length of board that meets legal driving limits. The mechanism has a slider and retention system, designed for users to pull the unit out with ease, and lower the boards in a controlled nature. Using the handle trigger, the rate at which the rack then slides downwards can be controlled by the user. The rack is made up of at least two modules, with support for additional, and can store up to 5 boards. Comprised of a base support and strap system, each module can be shifted and locked at any point along the length of the rack. The base support has two layers; the upper section features a ribbed design made from a polyurethane elastomer, with a compression layer below. The lower section is made from stainless steel, supporting the weight and rail for the sliding mechanism and straps. Made from a non-marking material, the straps can be wound back into its housing or locked into place, much like a seat-belt. A ratchet system at one end allows users to tighten the straps. Each strap unit can slide and lock along the racks width, and in conjunction with the modules sliding action, provides movement in either axis for any number of placement combinations that suits the users needs.

Named ‘Leg Up’, in light of its advantage over competing products, and its’ ability to lift your boards up.

Year
2020
School
Massey University, Wellington School of Design
Team Members
Ben Fernando, Charlie Budd, Thomas Mackisack
No items found.
Board Storage System

Leg Up

Board Storage System

Designed during New Zealand’s COVID-19 Alert Levels 4 to 2, the original brief for this university project was adapted to the circumstances. The resulting brief tasked us with utilising research completed prior to lockdown, identify an idea, and develop into an innovative design for a specific aspect of freedom camping or related field. Due to the circumstances, there was limited access to modelling materials and the final outcome was designed in CAD and digitally rendered.

Working as a group, we combined our research and found the opportunity to improve the accessibility and storage of board based sports products, while freedom camping. This was from the insight that adrenaline junkies were frustrated with rearranging their space throughout the day to accommodate their boards. This takes time away from their fun and negatively impacts their living conditions. To frame the research better, we developed a persona from interviews and a scenario highlighting their issues. This helped centre our design and was a common point of reference. We then began a series brainstorming, and picking out key terms and issues. After spending time on concepts, we refined our developments to 3 key concepts, each with aspects that were brought forward to our final, using a weighted matrix. Before making the final, we also developed a technical specification, researching different board sizes, and how existing roof racks functioned.

Designed on the specifications of the industry standard Toyota HiAce LV2000, the unit has potential for use on a wide range of vehicles. The rack has a length of 2 metres and width of 1.2 metres, and can effectively fit any length of board that meets legal driving limits. The mechanism has a slider and retention system, designed for users to pull the unit out with ease, and lower the boards in a controlled nature. Using the handle trigger, the rate at which the rack then slides downwards can be controlled by the user. The rack is made up of at least two modules, with support for additional, and can store up to 5 boards. Comprised of a base support and strap system, each module can be shifted and locked at any point along the length of the rack. The base support has two layers; the upper section features a ribbed design made from a polyurethane elastomer, with a compression layer below. The lower section is made from stainless steel, supporting the weight and rail for the sliding mechanism and straps. Made from a non-marking material, the straps can be wound back into its housing or locked into place, much like a seat-belt. A ratchet system at one end allows users to tighten the straps. Each strap unit can slide and lock along the racks width, and in conjunction with the modules sliding action, provides movement in either axis for any number of placement combinations that suits the users needs.

Named ‘Leg Up’, in light of its advantage over competing products, and its’ ability to lift your boards up.

Year
2020
School
Massey University, Wellington School of Design
Team Members
Ben Fernando, Charlie Budd, Thomas Mackisack
No items found.